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goalieThreeOne

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I took it as you were suggesting that line workers work with their hands, while "office workers" work with their brains and white-collar skills and would not be able to fill in working with their hands efficiently. I know plenty of white collar or salaried employees who worked manual labor and/or enjoyed hobbies that ended up in salaried positions at some point, but worked with their hands most of their lives outside of their employment at any given period in the career. I am 1 of them.
Yep that's where I was going with that. Working with your hands on a hobby you enjoy on the weekends is different from being plucked from your job to do tedious manual labor for hours a day, so I still maintain my original viewpoint. I actually hope I'm not right because as I'm scheduled now, I'm likely to be in the "office worker batch'. I guess we'll have to agree to disagree
 

jrRaptor

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My two cents...

When I started working in aircraft, most of the training was 1 to 2 weeks, then you start working. The training was pretty quick and simple, most people didn't have any experience. As my career progressed, I eventually got through school and internally earned my way up to engineering. Any time strike talks came around, they starting going through the salary (non-union) positions asking what skills and experience you had should the company need office workers to start replacing the missing plant workers on strike. There were always quite a few office people with factory experience that worked their way up or transferred to an office position for whatever reason. Sometimes positions needed to fill could be something like a forklift driver, other times it could be a painter, or a sheet metal assembler. Point being they likely wouldn't pull random people to do complex tasks they're completely unqualified for. Ford is just trying to slow the bleeding.
 

Mikknj

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I took it as you were suggesting that line workers work with their hands, while "office workers" work with their brains and white-collar skills and would not be able to fill in working with their hands efficiently. I know plenty of white collar or salaried employees who worked manual labor and/or enjoyed hobbies that ended up in salaried positions at some point, but worked with their hands most of their lives outside of their employment at any given period in the career. I am 1 of them.
There is no substitute for experience.... My friends who work in the office setting would not know a cross threaded bolt if it latched onto their finger.
 

Ranger#5?

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GumbyDammit
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As someone who’s worked at an automotive supplier, who went on strike, you don’t want that truck. The replacements do the best they can, but they’re just not trained like the regular workers. You’re talking about software developers, middle management, maybe engineers.
seems like a hollow outdated argument from long ago in this case. They have already been building the Ranger in multiple global locations for more than 1 year now, have been building current 5G in same plant for 4 years and build the new gen Bronco on the same line in the same factory. This is not re-inventing the wheel for some clueless non-mechanically inclined scabs, but rather plucking people with likely equal or greater aptitude who happen to be salaried to perform simple tasks that union grunts with mostly lower education were performing after a little on the job training. There will be virtually no difference in the finished product either way.
 

Ranger#5?

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There is no substitute for experience.... My friends who work in the office setting would not know a cross threaded bolt if it latched onto their finger.
don't know what generation you are from, but as someone who received a traditional education in the public school system, I can say you are completely off base here. Starting with 7th grade in 1970 all us boys were required to have at least 1 Industrial arts class per semester. I chose Wood shop and Introduction to Power Mechanics (small engine theory and repair with hands on lab work assignments), 8th Grade I chose Foundry and Metal Shop. 9th grade was advanced metal shop and basic electronics. My Sophomore year in high school 1974 there was more shop class offerings, so I added Auto Shop along with more metal shop and continued all the way through to graduation. The classes were always packed, and by 1975 they even started mandating girls take a minimum of shop classes and boys had to take 2 semesters of "Home Ec" classes as well for a more rounded real-life preparation to be functioning adults. Surely you are aware of the Baby Boom generation being the largest ever- and these so-called "office workers" are quite easily able to fill in for mostly low skilled and under educated line workers of later generations.
 

Mikknj

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don't know what generation you are from, but as someone who received a traditional education in the public school system, I can say you are completely off base here. Starting with 7th grade in 1970 all us boys were required to have at least 1 Industrial arts class per semester. I chose Wood shop and Introduction to Power Mechanics (small engine theory and repair with hands on lab work assignments), 8th Grade I chose Foundry and Metal Shop. 9th grade was advanced metal shop and basic electronics. My Sophomore year in high school 1974 there was more shop class offerings, so I added Auto Shop along with more metal shop and continued all the way through to graduation. The classes were always packed, and by 1975 they even started mandating girls take a minimum of shop classes and boys had to take 2 semesters of "Home Ec" classes as well for a more rounded real-life preparation to be functioning adults. Surely you are aware of the Baby Boom generation being the largest ever- and these so-called "office workers" are quite easily able to fill in for mostly low skilled and under educated line workers of later generations.
Interesting perspective. I suspect the individual production line jobs are pretty repetitive and structured around a specific build on the vehicle. You don't need to be an expert to get the job done. But it is reckless to assume that seasoned workers experience isn't valuable. Small errors if not caught can mean big trouble depending on where an error occurs. Seasoned workers are aware of these because of the time on the job. You pushed me a bit hard as I was actually poking fun at my friends who are not terribly handy with tools. By the way I was only a little behind you and learned shop just the same. Practical skills are not gone... The back yard mechanic in us all lives.
 

BadBoyBillyRaptorRanger

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If the UAW go out on strike this week plan on receiving a 2025 Ranger! The way all the other strikes are going this is going to be a long one.
 

Jerry204

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Agree. I would much prefer a UAW technician with experience building my Raptor whether one agrees with their current demand or not.
What I’ve read was the replacement will be working the inventory to keep parts moving to the dealers. There is no mention of them working the build lines.
 

rwolfcastle

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If the UAW go out on strike this week plan on receiving a 2025 Ranger! The way all the other strikes are going this is going to be a long one.
There is no way they'd halt production of all of their plants for an entire year. Their entire business would go under.
 

BadBoyBillyRaptorRanger

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There is no way they'd halt production of all of their plants for an entire year. Their entire business would go under.
I don’t see the big 3 agreeing to a 48% pay increase over 48 months, plus other benefits. They would go under because no one could afford an 80k Maverick 🤣
 

jrRaptor

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There is no way they'd halt production of all of their plants for an entire year. Their entire business would go under.
It works both ways, there's no way workers could afford to strike for a year. It only benefits both parties to meet somewhere in the middle.
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