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Texasota

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The one thing that the global product gets right over the US version is the availability of diesels. I still feel that is a very good usage for them. Its impossible to get decent MPG's out of a petrol motor on heavy body on frame trucks. Fords little eco does not do that great either. When the 2.3 is under boost its sucks it up. If Ford would offer their 2.2 bi turbo in the states then folks would be getting close to 30 mpgs. Easily. IMO, the electric stuff is still way off. The Range is still crap. Batteries don't perform as well in colder climates as well. But they do provide the needed low end torque. That's the only good thing about EV. But I'd take a diesel over that any day.
In the states there just isn't enough demand for diesels to make it worthwhile for Ford to offer them. Case in point being the 3.0 V6 diesel that was offered in the F-150 but has now been dropped because of poor sales. That engine is now being offered in the 2022 ROTW Ranger. A hybrid pickup (e.g. the Ford F-150 Powerboost) is more attactive as it gets comparable MPG, comparable (or better) torque, gasoline is cheaper than diesel in the states by a significant margin and you don't have to mess with the cost/hassel of DEF. And even better, the Pro Power Onboard generator that you can get with the F-150 Powerboost (and hopefully the PHEV Ranger) is an absolute killer option! I'll be surprised and very disappointed if that fantastic option is not offered on the Ranger PHEV. The Pro Power Onboard generator is the bait that will make me trade for a PHEV Ranger.
 

Texasota

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I am interested in the PHEV, but starting to think it does not make a lot of sense with the turbo. Not good when commuting within the range of the battery, the ICE motor will be barely used. Its proven that the 2.3L Turbo needs to be not babied as it is prone to not burning off the fuel in the oil and coking valves.
I was not aware it has been proven that babying the 2.3 causes valve coking. Can you point us to something on that? I'm also not aware that moderate fuel dilution in the 2.3 (which I experience) has been proven to cause any problems so far. Have not heard of any 5G Rangers blowing up because of this. The entire point of a PHEV is to ensure that the ICE does not run (or very little) during a majority of daily commutes. I don't think you should be worried about this. It will be a great power train!
 

Scooter

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Al

Yeah a lot of small case issues get blow out of proportion. The coking does eventually form on the intake valves. There are video's on removing the intake manifold and walnut blasting the build up. The 2.3L Eco boost has direct injection. Where the 2.7L has port and direct injection. The port injection washes the intake valves
1637875854518.png


The pictures show before and after blasting.
 

Scooter

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Just saying its best to take the 2.3L through a proper heat cycle. You use to not idle motors when starting up. Most wear occurs in the start up of a cold engine. You idle it longer to get the turbo oiled and warmed up. You idle again when shutting the motor off. Cooling down the turbo.
Stop and go traffic and short runs are not ideal for a turbo motor. Running the vehicle hard at times is beneficial to it. Its documented that turbo motors do have more fuel to be burnt off in the crank case then non turbo motors. This is why again the correct heat cycling of the motor is important to evaporate it off. Just thinking logically and my opinion on these matters. The PHEV and a turbo motor is not the best setup at times for heat cycling the motor. What do I know over Ford Engineers.
I apologize for going off topic.
 

FijiSun

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Just saying its best to take the 2.3L through a proper heat cycle. You use to not idle motors when starting up. Most wear occurs in the start up of a cold engine. You idle it longer to get the turbo oiled and warmed up. You idle again when shutting the motor off. Cooling down the turbo.
Stop and go traffic and short runs are not ideal for a turbo motor. Running the vehicle hard at times is beneficial to it. Its documented that turbo motors do have more fuel to be burnt off in the crank case then non turbo motors. This is why again the correct heat cycling of the motor is important to evaporate it off. Just thinking logically and my opinion on these matters. The PHEV and a turbo motor is not the best setup at times for heat cycling the motor. What do I know over Ford Engineers.
I apologize for going off topic.
With my driving habits it would be optimal for build up. I work 4 miles away. Lots of short runs. I did not know the 2.7 had dual injection. Another reason Ford needs to put that in the Ranger.
 

Texasota

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Just saying its best to take the 2.3L through a proper heat cycle. You use to not idle motors when starting up. Most wear occurs in the start up of a cold engine. You idle it longer to get the turbo oiled and warmed up. You idle again when shutting the motor off. Cooling down the turbo.
Stop and go traffic and short runs are not ideal for a turbo motor. Running the vehicle hard at times is beneficial to it. Its documented that turbo motors do have more fuel to be burnt off in the crank case then non turbo motors. This is why again the correct heat cycling of the motor is important to evaporate it off. Just thinking logically and my opinion on these matters. The PHEV and a turbo motor is not the best setup at times for heat cycling the motor. What do I know over Ford Engineers.
I apologize for going off topic.
Looking at it from a different direction, the points you are making are a strong argument for the PHEV being an ideal combination with the 2.3 turbo. That is, for those short trips where the ICE would not reach full operating temperature you will be driving on 100% EV mode (the ICE will never have to fire up). If you are exceeding the EV range of the Ranger PHEV, then you are probably on a longer highway trip which is the more desirable conditions for the 2.3 turbo to be operating. Seems to me if you think of it this way, the Ranger PHEV will reduce the fuel dilution in the oil caused by short trips (especially with cold temperatures).
 

Scooter

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Al

That was also my train of thought. Will have to see if the ICE motor stay's dormant when the electric motor is in use. Not understanding the presumed specs of the power output of a combined 362Hp and 502 lb/ft.
I am very interested in the Ranger PHEV. What I would plan to do is get an extended warranty as you are making the propulsion system more complicated with ICE and PHEV. I hope the system is durable enough for off road use. The PHEV would work well for me as I have a commute back and forth that would be within the distance of the PHEV system. I could charge it at work and I do have a close charging station near my apartment. That's one of the draw backs of the PHEV is you have to charge them often.
 

staryoshi

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How about the 3.3L for a hybrid model? 290/265 (iirc) hp/torque plus the electric boost sounds like a fun combination for Ranger with decent performance and solid economy.
 

Scooter

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Oh, that's my concern will the PHEV be offered in the Super Cab. I don't think I can wait for the EV Ranger. That would work for me with the extra room in the Frunk and the 5' bed.
 

Scooter

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How about the 3.3L for a hybrid model? 290/265 (iirc) hp/torque plus the electric boost sounds like a fun combination for Ranger with decent performance and solid economy.
Looks like only the 2.3L and 2.7L in the Raptor will be offered in the Ranger. Similar platform to the Bronco.
 

staryoshi

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Looks like only the 2.3L and 2.7L in the Raptor will be offered in the Ranger. Similar platform to the Bronco.
They seem to have left themselves a fair amount of configurability, so it'll be interesting to see what they do over its 8 year life. I adore the 2.7 though, so if I can get that without going raptor I will.
 

Texasota

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It is my understanding that both the 2.3 and the 2.7 are available in the Bronco and the Bronco Raptor is going to get a step up such as the 3.0 turbo that is in the Explorer. Since the Ranger is the same platform as the Bronco I’m betting you see the exact same power train options.
 

Scooter

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Will see if the 7 speed manual will be offered in the Ranger. Our speculation continues until it is released in North America.


1637897493179.png
 

FijiSun

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It is my understanding that both the 2.3 and the 2.7 are available in the Bronco and the Bronco Raptor is going to get a step up such as the 3.0 turbo that is in the Explorer. Since the Ranger is the same platform as the Bronco I’m betting you see the exact same power train options.
Makes sense since they modifiied the frame to except the V6 3 liter diesel overseas. I know some are worried they won't offer the 2.7 in the lower trims but since GM will most likely use their 2.7 as their base and only engine offer on the next Colorado that would put Ford out to pasture for base engine power. Because if GM keep their lower power V6 I can see Ford doubling down on the 2.3 for most of the Ranger lineup except for a tricked out and very expensive Raptor trim. But competition has a way of forcing an oem to change course. Then they might make that PHEV instead of offering up the 2.7. I'm on the fence on that. I've always been skeptical of buying something with both EV and ICE components because it just adds too much complexity. ON the other hand, it also offers the best of both worlds since full EV has too much compromise for many. Either way, its going to be a long wait for North America. I've already decided the 2.3 is a no go for me. And since the global truck will have different engine options we only sort of know what it will look like. We are clueless of what will be under the hood. I'm thinking we will have a full 18 months of wait.
 
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