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FYI: How to Check Your Tire Pressure

Floyd

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I have nitrogen in my Mustang and in two years I have not had it add any air or nitrogen.
I also had nitrogen in my Explorer Sport same thing.
On both those vehicles the dealer purged the factory air and serviced with the nitrogen.
When I took delivery of my Ranger I asked if it too was serviced with Nitrogen in the tires and they said that they only do Nitrogen in performance vehicles (Mustang and RX Sport).
I have had to adjust the tire pressure twice in 4 weeks on the Ranger, granted I have only added a total of two pounds but still...
BTW my tires were properly serviced by the dealer during "prep."
I am seriously considering a Nitrogen purge and fill on the Ranger...
Your Mustang must be a Cobra, Right:question: :idea:Otherwise how could it benefit from Snake Oil?:giggle:
Just kidding ..really.
 
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P. A. Schilke

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Hi Folks,

Yep...Dealer is supposed to adjust tire pressure but many dealers blame the factory. We build the Ranger and install the tires, the pressures are elevated for a reason, Seating the tire bead. So when the dealer falls to do so during PDI, the customer is critical of Ford for ride...This problem is and has been going on for so long it makes me cringe. I wish we could figure out a way to use the Tire Pressure Monitoring System, TPMS to indicate too high pressure and pop a warning, but we are not there yet. My as received tire pressures on my Ranger were over 70 psi! Told the salesman and he blamed Ford...I gently referred him to the Dealer PDI and he called me back apologetic...They missed the boat so to speak. I have a certified gauge as was required at Ford for any handling work. It agrees with the Dash Icon. Some gauges are "off" but by law the "off" is not all that great. Worst are the stick pencil gauges. Dial gauges are much better. I wish every owner was a fanatic about tire pressures...Sorry for this anal rant...one of my pet peeves...

Best,
Phil Schilke
Ranger Vehicle Engineering
Ford Motor Co. Retied
 

Sandman Ranger

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Not so, but...
Lets suppose for a moment that nitrogen does not escape through the tire material and that oxygen does, as contended by advocates.
Lets further suppose that it is significant enough to be measurable....
Why not just fill with air anyway, the concentration of nitrogen will become greater each time air is added and the oxygen escapes... leaving only the nitrogen.:crackup: FOR FREE!!!:clap:

BTW; if nitrogen is inherently dry and the atmosphere is 70% Nitrogen how does it get humid?

Also having painted more than 30 cars, I have never used nitrogen for applying paint, and low moisture is critical for a good paint job. A good air dryer on the compressor is more than adequate to provide dry air for paint or tires.

I assume that four green Schrader caps would be a LOT cheaper than than actually buying the service!
That way you could save money and impress your friends.

Here is an article which makes all the typical arguments comprised of the most pathetic hyperbole and junk science possible.:crazy:
Believe it if you choose...
https://www.barbourhendrickhonda.com/benefits-of-nitrogen.htm

I couldn't find a price,$ so could someone here please tell us what the typical cost of nitrogen tire service is?
Never said nitrogen did not pass through sidewalls. It does, just at a slower rate.
 

Sandman Ranger

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Hi Folks,

Yep...Dealer is supposed to adjust tire pressure but many dealers blame the factory. We build the Ranger and install the tires, the pressures are elevated for a reason, Seating the tire bead. So when the dealer falls to do so during PDI, the customer is critical of Ford for ride...This problem is and has been going on for so long it makes me cringe. I wish we could figure out a way to use the Tire Pressure Monitoring System, TPMS to indicate too high pressure and pop a warning, but we are not there yet. My as received tire pressures on my Ranger were over 70 psi! Told the salesman and he blamed Ford...I gently referred him to the Dealer PDI and he called me back apologetic...They missed the boat so to speak. I have a certified gauge as was required at Ford for any handling work. It agrees with the Dash Icon. Some gauges are "off" but by law the "off" is not all that great. Worst are the stick pencil gauges. Dial gauges are much better. I wish every owner was a fanatic about tire pressures...Sorry for this anal rant...one of my pet peeves...

Best,
Phil Schilke
Ranger Vehicle Engineering
Ford Motor Co. Retied
If they over inflate for seating, why does the plant not install an auto inflator that can inflate, deflate and then refill to spec? This would prevent shipping over inflated tires.
And easy thing to develop for a plant.

I know you said no once, I think, but thought the higher inflation was for shipping? Prevents bouncing of car on train or carrier. 70psi? I would want a new tire. May pressure is 44psi. Yes can hold 70 but not smart. Also a huge legal issue. If tire blows off wheel at 70psi can greatly injury someone nearby.
 

P. A. Schilke

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Never said nitrogen did not pass through sidewalls. It does, just at a slower rate.
Hi Folks,

Do not get scammed into doing nitrogen. Here is why...The advantage of nitrogen is it does not absorb water vapor. Water vapor reeks havoc with tire pressure. Regular air contains water vapor. So pumping in nitrogen in place of air is a good thing, eh? NO!! Reason is the tire was not evacuated of all air and water vapor. So your gain is minimal... Air Conditioning systems have to be "pulled down" before refrigerant is added. So if a shop drops the air out of the tire and refills it with nitrogen, you still have air and water vapor...You still have the same problem. Do not throw you money away on this scam. There are reputable people out there that evacuate and fill, but they are few and far between.

best,
Phil Schilke
Ranger Vehicle Engineering
Ford Motor Co. Retired
 

P. A. Schilke

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If they over inflate for seating, why does the plant not install an auto inflator that can inflate, deflate and then refill to spec? This would prevent shipping over inflated tires.
And easy thing to develop for a plant.

I know you said no once, I think, but thought the higher inflation was for shipping? Prevents bouncing of car on train or carrier. 70psi? I would want a new tire. May pressure is 44psi. Yes can hold 70 but not smart. Also a huge legal issue. If tire blows off wheel at 70psi can greatly injury someone nearby.
Hi..

Tire pressure was here in AZ in relative high ambient...so dismissed... Sidewall of the tire lists Max pressure for driving...not for installl. In my case dealer dropped the ball. I agree 70 plus was concerning, but when we were roadracing Rangers as part of the SCCA, we regularly bumped up pressures to stop sidewall compliance and never had a tire failure. Goodyear rep at the races approved... Thank you Carolyn A. Your "stock tires" were the best!

Bottom line. Inflate to the door label, not the sidewall.

best,
Phil Schilke
Ranger Vehicle Engineering
Ford Motor Co. Retired
 

Floyd

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Never said nitrogen did not pass through sidewalls. It does, just at a slower rate.
Exactly, so on that theory continual use of air would result in a higher and higher concentration of nitrogen,
Of course I was being facetious, as I consider the whole issue as silly...
It is persistent though, and not likely to die any time soon.
Those who feel that they benefit from it should buy it by all means.

I raced SCCA for about 14 years. and during that time I saw a LOT of stuff which was supposed to improve performance.
Some were good ideas, many were fraudulent or wishful thinking.
I once met a guy who was actually selling unsweetened orange Kool-Aid as a friction inhibitor.
He claimed that this "marvelous secret formula" would reduce lap times by as much as 5 seconds when rubbed on a car's finish just before a race.
Some guys actually bought it, and a couple of them actually swore buy it... Go figger!:crazy::giggle:

You are in good company with your position.
Even if the nitrogen idea had credence.. there must still be answers these questions...

1] Is it cost effective? What is the cost?

2] What percentage of air loss on a good street tire is due to permeation? (Negligible I'm sure)

3] If oxygen and moisture cause substantial damage, why worry about the inside of the tire...
what about the outside of the tire? (not to mention UV damage)


The advent of TPMS was due to the fact that most folks never even checked their tire pressure.
Even now they are most often checked only when the warning light comes on .
Losing the 3PSI necessary to trip the light can take years in some cases.
When it happens sooner it is most often the result of a substantial and rapid drop in ambient temperature and not actual air loss. You must still adjust tire pressure seasonally if you live where there are seasons.
 
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P. A. Schilke

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Exactly, so on that theory continual use of air would result in a higher and higher concentration of nitrogen,
Of course I was being facetious, as I consider the whole issue as silly...
It is persistent though, and not likely to die any time soon.
Those who feel that they benefit from it should buy it by all means.

I raced SCCA for about 14 years. and during that time I saw a LOT of stuff which was supposed to improve performance.
Some were good ideas, many were fraudulent or wishful thinking.
I once met a guy who was actually selling unsweetened orange Kool-Aid as a friction inhibitor.
He claimed that this "marvelous secret formula" would reduce lap times by as much as 5 seconds when rubbed on a car's finish just before a race.
Some guys actually bought it, and a couple of them actually swore buy it... Go figger!:crazy::giggle:
Hi Floyd,

What did you race? I was FSV....the old air cooled 1600 with IDA Downdraft Webers... Loved those Webers...So simple and worked so wonderfully...

Best.
Phil Schilke
Ranger Vehicle Engineering
Ford Motor Co. Reiterd.
 

Floyd

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Hi Floyd,

What did you race? I was FSV....the old air cooled 1600 with IDA Downdraft Webers... Loved those Webers...So simple and worked so wonderfully...

Best.
Phil Schilke
Ranger Vehicle Engineering
Ford Motor Co. Reiterd.
I was crewchief for a roadrace team.
We raced watercooled FWD VWs on roadrace courses across the midwest, like Blackhawk Farms and Road America.
After several seasons in Midwest Council and winning The "IT" class with our Scirocco, we moved on to a nationally ranked "G production" Cabrio .
After a couple years of making it to the Runoffs, we were on track for a national championship.
Unfortunately a couple of things conspired to put an end to our efforts... including a death in my driver's family.
I still have an attic full of late eighties VW parts if you need any!:giggle:
 
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Sandman Ranger

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Exactly, so on that theory continual use of air would result in a higher and higher concentration of nitrogen,
Of course I was being facetious, as I consider the whole issue as silly...
It is persistent though, and not likely to die any time soon.
Those who feel that they benefit from it should buy it by all means.

I raced SCCA for about 14 years. and during that time I saw a LOT of stuff which was supposed to improve performance.
Some were good ideas, many were fraudulent or wishful thinking.
I once met a guy who was actually selling unsweetened orange Kool-Aid as a friction inhibitor.
He claimed that this "marvelous secret formula" would reduce lap times by as much as 5 seconds when rubbed on a car's finish just before a race.
Some guys actually bought it, and a couple of them actually swore buy it... Go figger!:crazy::giggle:

You are in good company with your position.
Even if the nitrogen idea had credence.. there must still be answers these questions...

1] Is it cost effective? What is the cost?

2] What percentage of air loss on a good street tire is due to permeation? (Negligible I'm sure)

3] If oxygen and moisture cause substantial damage, why worry about the inside of the tire...
what about the outside of the tire? (not to mention UV damage)


The advent of TPMS was due to the fact that most folks never even checked their tire pressure.
Even now they are most often checked only when the warning light comes on .
Losing the 3PSI necessary to trip the light can take years in some cases.
When it happens sooner it is most often the result of a substantial and rapid drop in ambient temperature and not actual air loss. You must still adjust tire pressure seasonally if you live where there are seasons.
Cost? Years back I think I paid $5 per tire and could come back for refills no charge.

Air loss. On average 1-2psi a month. In big temp swings 30 deg more loss. Temp swings show impact on air in tire.

Inside of tire.
Inner layer is butyl rubber. This layer retains air. Never 100% cured so water can penetrate over time. Cracking in this layer increases air loss. Not a huge issue normally. Shops that maintain driers and water traps would have less issues or risk with normal air.

Nitrogen not silly, just an added cost and option.

Like tap water and bottled water.
Both work but for some reason we buy a lot of bottled water. More of a joke than nitrogen.
 

Floyd

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Cost? Years back I think I paid $5 per tire and could come back for refills no charge.

Air loss. On average 1-2psi a month. In big temp swings 30 deg more loss. Temp swings show impact on air in tire.

Inside of tire.
Inner layer is butyl rubber. This layer retains air. Never 100% cured so water can penetrate over time. Cracking in this layer increases air loss. Not a huge issue normally. Shops that maintain driers and water traps would have less issues or risk with normal air.

Nitrogen not silly, just an added cost and option.

Like tap water and bottled water.
Both work but for some reason we buy a lot of bottled water. More of a joke than nitrogen.
I know how tires are made, the question was rhetorical...
Yeah, I seldom drink bottled water, unless someone hands me one at a picnic, its kinda silly to me.

The Air loss question was really to make a point about permeation vs other losses, not really how much overall.
Tire pressure losses on modern tires ain't nuthin' compared to a few decades ago.
Remember when every station had air at the pump?
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Heck I didn't know for sure so I stooped to looking it up...
Nitrogen molecules (N 2) are larger than oxygen molecules (O 2) so therefore, pure nitrogen will permeate the walls of your tires less than oxygen molecules. But by how much? Well, a nitrogen molecule measures roughly 300 picometers while an oxygen molecule measures 292 picometers. That’s only a 2.6% difference in size.
 
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P. A. Schilke

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I was crewchief for a roadrace team.
We raced watercooled FWD VWs on roadrace courses across the midwest, like Blackhawk Farms and Road America.
After several seasons in Midwest Council and winning The "IT" class with our Scirocco, we moved on to a nationally ranked "G production" Cabrio .
After a couple years of making it to the Runoffs, we were on track for a national championship.
Unfortunately a couple of things conspired to put an end to our efforts... including a death in my driver's family.
I still have an attic full of late eighties VW parts if you need any!:giggle:
Blackhawk Farms...drag race between corners...burned up brake pads....Loved Road America...especially the Hurrydowns.. Bridge turn...gotta trust the cornerworkers... You know GP national champ Tom Reichenbacher in his Fiat X19? Fellow Ford employee. Never went to the runnoffs...way too much effort...

best,
Phil Schilke
Ranger Vehicle Engineering
Ford Motor Co. Retired.
 

Floyd

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Blackhawk Farms...drag race between corners...burned up brake pads....Loved Road America...especially the Hurrydowns.. Bridge turn...gotta trust the cornerworkers... You know GP national champ Tom Reichenbacher in his Fiat X19? Fellow Ford employee. Never went to the runnoffs...way too much effort...

best,
Phil Schilke
Ranger Vehicle Engineering
Ford Motor Co. Retired.
Not to steal the thread but...
When you say "too much effort" You really have to do it to know that.
I was fleet mechanic for XOM and often worked heavy equipment for 12 hour days in bad weather.
A "fun" weekend at the track was commonly more exhausting and demanding.

Ah! "GLORY DAYS":like::whew:
That's the name of my Pinto project car , built in Edison NJ... (Springsteen country)
Sort of a "Boss" Pinto!:wink:
 

Truckee Bill

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There are numerous threads going on right now about tire pressure questions. So here's one that should hopefully show up in search and get indexed so anyone with a Ranger knows this common issue.

Your tires are overinflated at the factory for shipping. The dealer is supposed to re-check the air pressure and reduce it to the correct amount before delivery. As many of us are finding out, this is not the case and the tires are still overinflated upon delivery.

Check your driver's door sticker to see the proper pressure (psi). Many Rangers are seeing delivery pressure of 40 and above (mine was 37)

There's few ways to check your tire pressure:


1) Use a good old fashioned tire pressure gauge.

tire-pressure-gauge.jpg



2. Use the tire pressure display in your instrument cluster.

This can be reached by going to Driver Assist > Tire Pressure.

tire-pressure-display.png



3) Use the Ford Pass App (charges may apply)


The Ford Pass App shows you a variety of info about your Ranger, one of which is your Tire Pressure!

fordpass-app-tire-e1551404648622.png

.
Thank you! I couldn't figure out how to check tire pressure from the instrument gauge.
 

Truckee Bill

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